Samoa

1. During a recent survey around Upolu, Savaii and Nuutele the Yellow Crazy Ant was both observed and collected as samples in different locations.

To determine the top 20 manageable invasive plants in Samoa and to then prioritises the work that needs to be done to manage them effectively. The workshop will aim:

The islands of Nu'utele and Nu'ulua have been identified as highly significant sites for conservation in Samoa. They hold large populations of species currently found nowhere else in the country' including threatened land-birds, seabirds and nesting

This document builds on lessons learned from 10 years of DEC-MNRE action on the myna issue, training workshops on invasive species management, a 2015 myna population transect survey (conservative estimate of total population in Samoa between 129,407 and 188,583 birds), appropriate literature and experiences in Pacific and other countries. Recommendations are made on strategies and the priority information needed to implement those strategies.

The Samoan islands of Nuutele and Nuulua from part of the Aleipata Marine Protected Area, in recognition of their contribution to biological diversity in Samoa. In a 1986 review of 226 islands in the South Pacific region, these islands together rated 30th in importance for biological diversity. The islands provide essential habitat for a reange of sea birds, bats and land birds such as the rare friendly ground dove, sea turtles, shell fish and other marine life.

An outbreak of the crown of thorn starfish (Acanthaster planci) was observed in a number of villages after the 2009 tsunami. The Division of Environment and Conservation (DEC) of Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MNRE) and the Fisheries Division of the Ministry of Agriculture worked with the communities to collect the starfish mainly from the areas along the south and southeast coast of Upolu Island. This activity was undertaken to remove the majority of the COTs to reduce the impacts on the reef.