Invasive Species

A workshop was held for members and partners of the Palau National Invasive Species Committee (NISC) from March 26-28, 2013, with the purpose of drafting a strategic action plan (SAP). Workshop participants initially carried out a review of the goals and objectives of the previous NISC action plan (2007-10). The goals were then revised, and a new goal, Goal 6, was adopted, to ensure that activities in the plan are adequately resourced.

Invasive species pose one of the greatest ecological threats to America’s lands and waters. Their control can be complex and expensive and is often conducted in perpetuity; their harm can be irreversible. Early detection and rapid response (EDRR) actions can reduce the long-term costs and economic burden that invasive species have on communities.

The intentional and unintentional transfer of species from one water body to another around the world has boomed in recent decades. Many seas and regions have been invaded by a high number of non-native species. Some of these species thrive in their new habitats, out-competing native species and changing

Pacilic island countries are particularly vulnerable to the effects of invasive species. After habitat destruction or modification, invasive species are responsible for more species extinctions than any other cause. Further, the rate of extinction of native species has been higher on islands than anywhere else in the world. Invasive species have also degraded native ecosystems.