Yellow crazy ant

1. During a recent survey around Upolu, Savaii and Nuutele the Yellow Crazy Ant was both observed and collected as samples in different locations.

Invasive ants are a diverse group of aggressive, competitive, dominating ant species that can rapidly establish and spread. Several ant species are amongst the most serious global invasive species. Their broad diets, nesting habits, ability to breed rapidly, high densitites and adaptibility to varied habitats make them excellent invaders. Agricultural economic, environmental and social wellbeing are threatened by these ants, many of which have been introduced to, and established in, many countries

Lack of biological knowledge of invasive species is recognised as a major factor contributing to eradication failure. Management needs to be informed by a site-specific understanding of the invasion system. Here, we describe targeted research designed to inform the potential eradication of the invasive yellow crazy ant Anoplolepis gracilipes on Nu'utele island, Samoa. First, we assessed the ant's impacts on invertebrate biodiversity by comparing invertebrate communities between infested and uninfested sites. Second, we investigated whether an association existed between A.

Many ant species that have been accidentally spread throughout the world have significant economic, environmental and social impacts in areas that they now infest. One of the most notable invasive ants is the Yellow crazy ant, A. gracilipes, and this species is present in Samoa, including on the Aleipata islands. The Aleipata islands are considered to be of great regional conservation significance because they are uninhabited, relatively pristine, contain many species threatened throughout greater Samoa, and lack many exotic species present within greater Samoa. The presence of A.