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In hardwood subtropical forests of southern Florida, nonnative vines have been hypothesized to be detrimental, as many species form dense ‘‘vine blankets’’ that shroud the forest. To investigate the effects of nonnative vines in post-hurricane regeneration, we set up four large (two pairs of 30 3 60 m) study areas in each of three study sites.

We conducted ant surveys on Santa Cruz Island, the largest of the California Channel Islands, in 1975/6, 1984, 1993 and 1998. Our surveys yielded a combined total of 34 different ant species: Brachymyrmex cf. depilis, Camponotus anthrax, C. clarithorax, C. hyatti, C. semitestaceus, C. vicinus, C. sp. near vicinus, C. yogi, Cardiocondyla ectopia, Crematogaster californica, C. hespera, C. marioni, C. mormonum, Dorymyrmex bicolor, D. insanus (s.l.), Formica lasioides, F. moki, Hypoponera opacior, Leptothorax andrei, L.

The giant African snail, Achatina fulica Bowdich, one of the most destructive molluscan pests of many tropical areas of the world, became established in Hawaii November 30, 1936. To control this pest predaceous snails, Gonaxis quadrilateralis (Preston), G. kibweziensis (E. A. Smith), and Euglandina rosea (Ferussac) were introduced. According the Davis, the population of A. Fulica has declined markedly in recent years and numerous empty shells have been observed in many areas of Oahu.

The Plant Pest Control Branch (formerly Entomology Branch) of the Hawaii Department of Agriculture has maintained a beneficial organism introduction program for many years. This paper provides notes on the status of some pests and their purposely introduced natural enemies and a list of insects introduced and released for biological control during 1979 and 1980. All beneficial introductions are thoroughly screened and studied in a quarantine facility and must go through a clearance process prior to being released.

Invasive snakes can lead to the rapid extinction of endemic vertebrates on insular ecosystems, usually because snakes are an efficient and novel predator. There have been no successful (i.e. complete) eradications to date of invasive snakes on islands. In this study we assess a novel invasion on Gran Canaria in the Canary Islands. The invader, the California king snake (Lampropeltis californiae), arrived from California via several generations in the pet trade. King snakes are captive bred for various phenotypes, and first were detected in the wild on Gran Canaria in the 1990s.

After decades of biodiversity loss and economic burden caused by the brown treesnake invasion on the Pacific island of Guam, relief hovers on the horizon. Previous work by USDA Wildlife Services (WS) and its National Wildlife Research Center (NWRC) demonstrated that brown treesnake numbers in forested habitats can be dramatically