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Disturbances that remove primary producers and alter substrate chemistry commonly influence ecosystem carbon dynamics. Because coastal wetlands are especially effective in sequestering carbon, quantifying how disturbances may alter their ability to perform this climate-regulating function is important for assessing their carbon storage potential.

In hardwood subtropical forests of southern Florida, nonnative vines have been hypothesized to be detrimental, as many species form dense ‘‘vine blankets’’ that shroud the forest. To investigate the effects of nonnative vines in post-hurricane regeneration, we set up four large (two pairs of 30 3 60 m) study areas in each of three study sites.

The giant African snail, Achatina fulica Bowdich, one of the most destructive molluscan pests of many tropical areas of the world, became established in Hawaii November 30, 1936. To control this pest predaceous snails, Gonaxis quadrilateralis (Preston), G. kibweziensis (E. A. Smith), and Euglandina rosea (Ferussac) were introduced. According the Davis, the population of A. Fulica has declined markedly in recent years and numerous empty shells have been observed in many areas of Oahu.

The Plant Pest Control Branch (formerly Entomology Branch) of the Hawaii Department of Agriculture has maintained a beneficial organism introduction program for many years. This paper provides notes on the status of some pests and their purposely introduced natural enemies and a list of insects introduced and released for biological control during 1979 and 1980. All beneficial introductions are thoroughly screened and studied in a quarantine facility and must go through a clearance process prior to being released.

Invasive species affect each of our lives, all regions of the U.S., and every nation in the world. Society pays a great price for invasive species - costs measured not just in dollars, but also in unemployment, damaged goods and equipment, power failures, food and water shortages, environmental degradation, increased rates and severity of natural disasters, disease epidemics, and even lost lives. Stimulated by the rapid global expansion of trade, transport, and travel, invasive species and their costs to society are increasing at an alarming rate.

Invading alien species in the United States cause major environmental damages and losses adding up to almost $120 billion per year. There are approximately 50,000 foreign species and the number is increasing. About 42% of the species on the Threatened or Endangered species lists are at risk primarily because of alien-invasive species.

The Brown Tree Snake (Boiga irregularis) has caused ecological and economic damage to Guam, and the snake has the potential to colonize other islands in the Paci c Ocean. This study quanti es the potential economic damage if the snake were translocated, established in the state of Hawai‘i, and causing damage at levels similar to those on Guam. Damages modeled included costs of medical treatments due to snakebites, snake-caused power outages, and decreased tourism resulting from effects of the snake.