Strategy

The Convention on Biological Diversity has been adopted by many countries, resulting in the development of national biodiversity strategies. This illustrates the international recognition of the importance of protecting ecosystems. However, ecosystems still face many threats, some of them growing and spreading so rapidly as to cause irreversible deterioration in many countries and areas.

The Pacific region has benefited from a number of regional and national programmes to both assess the impacts of climate change on biodiversity and develop programmes to adapt to climate change. Such programmes are critical considering that the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 1/ states that the Pacific region has already experienced temperature increases of as much as 1°C since 1910.

La Convention pour la Diversite Biologique (CBD) developpee en 1992 lors du sommet de l'Organisation des Nations Unies a Rio de Janeiro reflete la reaction de la communaute mondiale face a l'erosion acceleree de la biodiversite mondiale.

Invasive species are a major global threat to biodiversity and Pacific Islands are particularly vulnerable due to their isolation and relatively recent human occupation. Their native species often cannot cope with predation or competition from new arrivals. Niue already suffers from the impact of invasive species that have arrive in the country. However there are many more devastating species that are not present but found in other countries of the region and every effort needs to be made to prevent their arrivals.