recovery

The small uninhabited island of Monuriki (40.4 ha) in western Fiji is of national and international conservation concern for its several protected species. Exotic invasive species and a Category 5 cyclone have exacerbated conservation challenges. The cooperation of local, national, and international stakeholders continues to be crucial in restoration of the island’s native ?ora and fauna. This summary presents a timeline of restoration efforts and current status of the recovery programme for Monuriki.

Considerable bene?ts can be achieved for indigenous biodiversity when invasive vertebrates are removed from islands. In New Zealand, two logistically challenging eradications were undertaken, one to remove cats (Felis catus) and the other Paci?c rats (Rattus exulans) from Te Hauturu-o-Toi/Little Barrier Island (Hauturu). Here we document the short- and long-term impacts of these interventions on the biodiversity of Hauturu. We also assess the extent to which predicted outcomes were re?ected in the measured responses for a wide range of species.

Rats were eradicated in 2005–2006 from the islands of Canna and Sanday, Scotland (total area 1,320 ha). Poison bait was laid from December 2005 onwards and the last rat was killed in February 2006. An intensive period of monitoring over the next two years con?rmed that no rats remained on the islands. Seabirds have been monitored on Canna for nearly 50 years and some species have shown good evidence of recovery since the eradication.