PILN-IAS

Rodent eradications undertaken on tropical islands are more likely to fail than eradications undertaken at higher latitudes. We report on 12 independent rodent eradication projects undertaken on tropical islands that utilized the results of an in situ bait availability study prior to eradication to inform, a priori, the bait application rate selected for the eradication. These projects also monitored bait availability during the eradication.

Invasive mammal eradications are a proven, effective method of restoring damaged ecosystems and preserving biodiversity. On most tropical oceanic islands indigenous land crabs compete with targeted alien species for bait and interfere with traps and detection devices. Current eradication practices are inherited from successful termperate or subantarctic campaigns, yet we do not possess trued and tried methods for managing land crab interference.

Invasive species is one of the greatest threats to Samoa's biodiversity, it damages habitat for native plants and animals, loss of subsistence resources, economic loss especially the health of people. Invasive species could be anything that is introduced to a certain area, thus cause negative impacts to the environment as a whole.

The Division of Environment and Conservation of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of the Government of Samoa (DEC-MNRE) is implementing a project as part of the Global Environment Facility - Pacific Alliance for Sustainability (GEF-PAS) Invasive Alien Species project funded by the United Nations Environment Program and executed by SPREP. The project identifies the need to determine realistic management goals and best management practices for myna species in Samoa and use them to write a management plan.

Myna birds are categorized in the ‘starling family’, they are native to Southern Asia

On Tuesday 24th June 2014, the terrestrial section of the Division of Environment and