Palau

Angaur is a 8.4 sq. km island located (654' N, 134 09' E) in the southwestern Palau Islands. The island makes up one of the Republic of Palau’s 16 states. Angaur has suffered considerable land degradation due to past phosphate mining as well as military action during WWII. Land degradation problems in recent years have been compounded by El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) high tides exacerbated by a gradual increase in average sea level attributed to climate change.

This document is part of a technical report series on conservation projects funded by the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) and the Conservation International Pacific Islands Program (CI-Pacific). The main purpose of this series is to disseminate project findings and successes to a broader audience of conservation professionals in the Pacific, along with interested members of the public and students. The reports are being prepared on an ad-hoc basis as projects are completed and written up.

The Pacific islands of Oceania cover almost 15% of the world’s surface and are characterised by a high degree of ecosystem and species diversity. The region is characterised by thousands of isolated small coral atolls and higher volcanic islands, which has led to the high diversity of species found today. In fact, the number of plants and animals found nowhere else on earth (endemic species) is extremely high - often up to 90% for particular groups. Often, these rare and endemic species are adapted to specialised habitats and limited to small areas of a few islands.

The Republic of Palau requested assistance from the US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry, to conduct a survey of invasive plant species of environmental concern. A less comprehensive survey was conducted as part of a general survey of the major Micronesian islands in 19982. Similar surveys have been conducted in American

The purpose of the National Invasive Species Strategy is to minimize the harmful effects of invasive species on the environment and society of Palau through coordination of efforts at all levels of Palauan society, and to facilitate cooperation with neighboring countries and the Pacific Islands region to prevent the movement of invasive species.

In 2002, The Republic of Palau requested assistance from the US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry, to conduct a survey of invasive plant species of environmental concern. A comprehensive survey of the entire country was conducted and a report of the findings was submitted to the Government of Palau in 20032. This superseded a more cursory survey of the major species of environmental concern conducted in 19983. The present survey was requested as a follow-up to the 2002 survey.