NBSAP

The Cook Islands signed the Convention on Biological Diversity at the Earth Summit in 1992. As a Party to the Convention, the Cook Islands Government committed itself and its people to conserve its biodiversity, to use it in a sustainable manner, and to share its benefits in an equitable manner. It also committed itself to control invasive species (the weeds and pest animals in natural ecosystems and agricultural systems), and to reduce the likelihood of future invasions.

The biodiversity within the Solomon Island's geographical and political boundary are continuously under pressure from habitat destruction, overexploitation, waste, invasive species and climate change. Capacity constraints emanating from the absence of biodiversity values, institutional constraints, inadequate finance and the lack of scientific information are consequently undermining effort to lessen these pressures on biodiversity.

The Pacific region has benefited from a number of regional and national programmes to both assess the impacts of climate change on biodiversity and develop programmes to adapt to climate change. Such programmes are critical considering that the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 1/ states that the Pacific region has already experienced temperature increases of as much as 1°C since 1910.

Biodiversity is suffering dramatic declines across the globe, threatening the ability of ecosystems to provide the services on which humanity depends. Mainstreaming biodiversity into the plans, strategies and policies of dif-different economic sectors is key to reversing these declines.

This Symposium represented an unprecedented collaborative effort among government, community groups, and traditional leaders to shift our thinking and perspective: To redefine Palau’s environment for Palauans today and tomorrow