Myna

The Division of Environment and Conservation of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of the Government of Samoa (DEC-MNRE) is implementing a project as part of the Global Environment Facility - Pacific Alliance for Sustainability (GEF-PAS) Invasive Alien Species project funded by the United Nations Environment Program and executed by SPREP. The project identifies the need to determine realistic management goals and best management practices for myna species in Samoa and use them to write a management plan.

Myna birds are categorized in the ‘starling family’, they are native to Southern Asia

On Tuesday 24th June 2014, the terrestrial section of the Division of Environment and

Myna birds are now found at high population around Samoa. They were at sight everywhere but seem more frequent around people's compounds and personal properties as well. Upon completion of the 9th poison baiting operation, the team conducted its 10th phase of baiting operation in Savaii for two weeks. This work marked as the second control work to be done in the big island.

Indian myna birds were introduced in Samoa within different periods for such reasons as to control cattle ticks. They have now spread to most parts of two main habitat islands of Samoa, Upolu and Savaii. The two introduced species of myna have now been commonly known as the Common Myna and the Jungle Myna.

In Seychelles, the common myna has been shown to have a negative impact on endangered endemic birds on Denis Island, interfering with breeding attempts and attacking adult endemic birds at their nests. This stimulated an attempt to eradicate the island's mynas.

The Indian, or common, myna, Acridotheres tristis (Sturnidae: Passeriformes: Aves) was introduced throughout New Zealand in the 1870?s by locals and Acclimatisation Societies (Bull et al., 1985). Birds subsequently established in most of the North Island, with high densities present in the urban and suburban areas. Common mynas continue to flourish in the northern and central North Island, and are usually more abundant than most native birds in gardens and parks (LCR, 2008)

In November 2007 and November 2008, we conducted a bird and mammal survey on Wallis and Futuna. We found two non-native bird species on Wallis: the Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) and the Chestnut-breasted Munia (Lonchura castaneothorax), and one on Futuna: the Jungle Myna (Acridotheres fuscus). We also recorded Black Rats (Rattus rattus) on Futuna, a recent introduction to this island. The introduction of 3 bird species and Black Rats in the last decade denotes a lack of preventive measures and demonstrates that the issue of invasive species has not received sufficient priority.

This document builds on lessons learned from 10 years of DEC-MNRE action on the myna issue, training workshops on invasive species management, a 2015 myna population transect survey (conservative estimate of total population in Samoa between 129,407 and 188,583 birds), appropriate literature and experiences in Pacific and other countries. Recommendations are made on strategies and the priority information needed to implement those strategies.