Myna

The Jungle myna (Acridotheres fuscus) was first recorded in Upolu in 1965, followed by the Common myna (Acridotheres tristis) in 1988 (Watling, 2001). It is believed they were introduced to control livestock ticks and unexpectedly became an invasive species; over the past two decades their populations have increased dramatically. They are now found throughout Samoa with high density populations concentrated in the Apia town area and neighboring villages

Observations made during visits to Rarotonga in July and August 1976 are detailed, with particular reference to land birds and petrels, a group not previously recorded. The outstanding feature of the land bird ecology is the apparent total restriction of the native species except Long-tailed cuckoo to the central primitive forests and adjacent second growth. The native land bird fauna consists of only five species: Long-tailed Cuckoo, Pacific Pigeon, Rarotonga Fruit Dove, Rarotonga Flycatcher and the Rarotonga Starling, of which the last three are endemic.

In November 2007 and November 2008, we conducted a bird and mammal survey on Wallis and Futuna. We found two non-native bird species on Wallis: the Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) and the Chestnut-breasted Munia (Lonchura castaneothorax), and one on Futuna: the Jungle Myna (Acridotheres fuscus). We also recorded Black Rats (Rattus rattus) on Futuna, a recent introduction to this island. The introduction of 3 bird species and Black Rats in the last decade denotes a lack of preventive measures and demonstrates that the issue of invasive species has not received sufficient priority.

Myna birds are now found at high population around Samoa. They were at sight everywhere but seem more frequent around people's compounds and personal properties as well. Upon completion of the 9th poison baiting operation, the team conducted its 10th phase of baiting operation in Savaii for two weeks. This work marked as the second control work to be done in the big island.

Indian myna birds were introduced in Samoa within different periods for such reasons as to control cattle ticks. They have now spread to most parts of two main habitat islands of Samoa, Upolu and Savaii. The two introduced species of myna have now been commonly known as the Common Myna and the Jungle Myna.

This report is based on official trip made to Onotoa early this year 2014. IAS project under ECD together with ALD from MELAD was made to fulfill the obligation of ECD as an implementing agency. In 2012, there is a survey trip made to confirm the distribution and number of myna birds on Onotoa in order to set up appropriate actions to cease the disturbances and destruction caused by this bird.

The Division of Environment and Conservation of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of the Government of Samoa (DEC-MNRE) is implementing a project as part of the Global Environment Facility - Pacific Alliance for Sustainability (GEF-PAS) Invasive Alien Species project funded by the United Nations Environment Program and executed by SPREP. The project identifies the need to determine realistic management goals and best management practices for myna species in Samoa and use them to write a management plan.