Myna

Common mynas have been introduced (often as biocontrol for insects) or colonised many islands in the Pacific. They are one cause of decline in some native bird species such as endemic kingfishers, and are a pest when they damage fruit and compete for food to put out for domestic animals.

The Jungle myna (Acridotheres fuscus) was first recorded in Upolu in 1965, followed by the Common myna (Acridotheres tristis) in 1988 (Watling, 2001). It is believed they were introduced to control livestock ticks and unexpectedly became an invasive species; over the past two decades their populations have increased dramatically. They are now found throughout Samoa with high density populations concentrated in the Apia town area and neighboring villages

The Ministry of Environment, Lands and Agricultural Development (MELAD) has received funds through

A programme to eradicate two species of myna from Kiribati was carried out between November 2014 and November 2015 by staff of the Environment & Conservation Division, Ministry of Environment, Lands and Agricultural Development with funds through the regional GEF-PAS Invasives project coordinated by UNEP and SPREP, assisted by international consultant Dave Butler.

This report is based on official trip made to Onotoa early this year 2014. IAS project under ECD together with ALD from MELAD was made to fulfill the obligation of ECD as an implementing agency. In 2012, there is a survey trip made to confirm the distribution and number of myna birds on Onotoa in order to set up appropriate actions to cease the disturbances and destruction caused by this bird.

Observations made during visits to Rarotonga in July and August 1976 are detailed, with particular reference to land birds and petrels, a group not previously recorded. The outstanding feature of the land bird ecology is the apparent total restriction of the native species except Long-tailed cuckoo to the central primitive forests and adjacent second growth. The native land bird fauna consists of only five species: Long-tailed Cuckoo, Pacific Pigeon, Rarotonga Fruit Dove, Rarotonga Flycatcher and the Rarotonga Starling, of which the last three are endemic.