Management Plan

Invasive alien species represent an insidious and pervasive threat to the environmental, economic and human well-being of the Pacific islands. Pacific island ecosystems make up one of the world’s important biodiversity hotspots, with high numbers of endemic species that are particularly vulnerable to extinction due to their limited habitat and isolation.

Rodents are a key pest to agricultural and rural island communities of the South Pacific, but there is limited information of their impact on the crops and livelihoods of small-scale farmers.

American Samoa invasive species strategy and action plan for the only US territory in the South Pacific being such is faced with unique threats with its location from a national perspective and has a need for both nation al and regional collaborations. The ecological integrity of American Samoa is of utmost importance in the face of invasive species. The cultural identity of American Samoans is also closely tied to the ecological integrity of its natural environment.

The 2017-2019 Interim Guam Invasive Species Management Plan (GISMP) expresses the overarching goals and priorities of the Guam Invasive Species Council (GISC or Council). The Guam Invasive Species Act of 2011 (Public Law 31-43) established the Council as Guam’s lead entity in coordinating with local, regional, national, and international jurisdic¬tions in the fight against alien invasive species. Although the GISC is in its infancy stages of organization, it draws from the collective knowledge, past research, and progress of its members in establishing the Council’s goals and priorities.

Resilience underpins the sustainability of both ecological and social systems. Extensive loss of reef corals following recent mass bleaching events have challenged the notion that support of system resilience is a viable reef management strategy.

The first of two workshops on Marine and Coastal Biodiversity in the Tropical Island Pacific Region was held at the East-West Center in Honolulu on 2 - 4 November 1994. The goal of the first workshop was to review the status of species systematics and database management studies and develop an action plan for marine and coastal biodiversity information management for the region. The workshop was divided into three parts...

This NAP communicates adaptation efforts across multiple government entities together under one document. The NAP influences and accelerates the national development pathway towards climate-resilient development. It seeks to improve resilience against changes in climate but also climate variability which will also increase under future scenarios.

International Symposium on, Managing vertebrate invasive species. August 7-9, 2007, Hilton Fort Collins, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.

Invasive species affect each of our lives, all regions of the U.S., and every nation in the world. Society pays a great price for invasive species - costs measured not just in dollars, but also in unemployment, damaged goods and equipment, power failures, food and water shortages, environmental degradation, increased rates and severity of natural disasters, disease epidemics, and even lost lives. Stimulated by the rapid global expansion of trade, transport, and travel, invasive species and their costs to society are increasing at an alarming rate.