management actions

With marine biodiversity declining globally at accelerating rates, maximising the effectiveness of conservation has become a key goal for local, national and international regulators

New Zealand has been the world leader in the eradication of invasive mammalian predators from offshore islands. Today, the focus for invasive predator management is shifting to larger landscapes; big inhabited islands or the mainland itself. The most cost-effective approach in the long term will be to eradicate the predators from those areas, ensuring permanent freedom for vulnerable and threatened native biodiversity to recover or be reintroduced. Island eradication technologies cannot always be employed on the mainland (e.g. aerial brodifacoum), so a new approach is required.

Indicators for tracking conservation efforts at a global scale are rare but important tools for understanding trends and measuring progress towards global conservation targets. Eradication of invasive species from islands is an increasingly used conservation intervention in countries and territories around the world. With a goal of collating these efforts, the Database of Islands and Invasive Species Eradications (DIISE) holds records of the location, target species, year and outcome of invasive mammal and bird eradications on islands from around the world.

The 16 UK Overseas Territories (OTs) together account for 94% of the UK’s unique biodiversity and make a significant contribution to global biodiversity. Being predominantly islands, the OTs are very vulnerable to the introduction of potentially harmful invasive non-native species, and pressures are increasing with the continual growth of international trade and impact of climate change. Biosecurity is acknowledged as the most cost-effective means of addressing invasive species threats for small islands, and yet the OTs face many challenges in the implementation of biosecurity controls.

Pacific island ecosystems make up one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots, with high levels of endemism. However, Pacific islands areparticularly vulnerable to invasive species; because of their isolation and relatively recent human occupation, native species have not evolved to cope with the impacts of predators, herbivores...

Video of Little Fire Ant, Wasmania auropunctata, Regional Alian Invasive Species Project funded by Global Environmental Facility - Pacific Alliance for education of the problems they cause to the community; instructions on eradication by baiting of Little Fire Ants on Vanuatu described and recommendation of best investiment and management for alien invasive species is to have quarantine and biosecurity systems in place with trained personnel and resources to prevent the spread of alien invasive species coming into the country and spreading within the country.

Australia can’t afford to allow in any more insect colonists like red imported fire ants, electric ants, browsing ants, yellow crazy ants, Argentine ants, African big-headed ants, Asian honeybees, large earth bumblebees and German wasps. These invaders are costing both the Australian environment and economy dearly. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent on Australia-wide eradications of red fire ants, electric ants and browsing ants because of their potential for devastating harm to wildlife and impacts on people.

In 1989, the kakerori (Pomarea dimidiata) was one of the 10 rarest birds in the world with a declining population of just 29 individuals living in forested hill country in the Takitumu Conservation Area (TCA) of south-eastern Rarotonga, Cook Islands. Following 12 years of rat poisoning, the population had increased to 255 birds in August 2001. The programme then shifted from ‘species recovery’ to ‘sustainable management’ of the Rarotonga population at 250 to 300 birds. The rat poisoning effort was reduced, and an ‘insurance’ population was established on Atiu.