Management Action-Management

Rodent eradications are a key island restoration activity to counteract extinction and endangerment to native species. Despite the widespread use of brodifacoum as a rodenticide for island restoration, there has been little examination of its potential negative effects on native reptiles. Here we examined the survival of two endemic insular lizard populations before, during and after a brodifacoum-based rodent eradication using a mark-recapture study.

A pilot project for the eradication of beavers (Castor canadensis) in Tierra del Fuego started as part of a bi-national agreement, signed between Argentina and Chile, to restore the affected environments. The project covers nine pilot areas of different landscapes and land tenures in the Argentinian part of Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego. We report on the results from operations in the fi rst of the pilot areas.

Aerial broadcast application is currently one of the most common methods for conducting rodent eradications on islands, particularly islands greater than 100 ha or with complex and difficult topography where access by ground teams is difficult. Overall, aerial broadcast applications have a high success rate, but can be burdened by logistical, regulatory, and environmental challenges. This is particularly true for islands where complex shorelines, sheer terrain, and the interface with the marine environment pose additional risks and concerns.

Eradication techniques using ground-based devices were developed in New Zealand in the early 1970s to target invasive rodents. Since then, different bait station designs, monitoring tools and rodenticide baits have been developed, and changes in field techniques have improved and streamlined these operations. The use of these techniques has been taken around the world to eradicate rodents from islands. Eradication technology has moved rapidly from ground-based bait station operations to aerial application of rodenticides.

Biological control of weeds in Vanuatu began in 1935, with the introduction of the tinged Teleonemia scrupulosa to control Lantana camara. To date, nine biological control agents have been intentionally introduced to control eight weed species. Seven of these agents have established on their respective hosts while an eighth, Zygogramma bicolorata, an agent for Parthenium hysterophorus has only recently been released and establishment is unlikely.

The main outcome of the project was the control or significant reduction of chromolaena in most provinces of PNG. Areas that were once monostands of chromolaena have been converted back into subsistence farms, and plantations in which chromolaena was the main understorey species are now clear of the weed. This outcome was the result of the primary outputs of the project: (a) knowledge of the extent of the chromolaena problem and its impact of the livelihoods of smallholders, (b) an understanding of effective biocontrol agents and (c) significant capacity built in biocontrol of weeds.

NEMS is SPREP's Environmental Monitoring and governance (EMG) Programme provides technical support in collaboration with Member countries' environmental agencies.

This national ocean policy aims to protect and increase the value of resources of ocean and also the inherent value of the marine ecosystems and species upon which that wealth relies on.