Management Action-Management

The papers and abstracts published in this book are the outcome of the conference on Island Invasives: Eradication and Management held at Tamaki Campus, University of Auckland, New Zealand from 5 to 12 February 2010, hosted by the Centre for Biodiversity and Biosecurity (University of Auckland and Landcare Research), in collaboration with the IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group.

This document is to report on the work carried out to assess the status and the possibility of controlling beach burr (Cenchrus Echinatus) on the island of Pukapuka. This work was conducted by the National Environment Service and funded under the Regional Invasive species program.

The Island of Suwarrow and its surrounding waters was declared a National Park in 1978 under the Conservation Act 1975. The legal opinion sought in 2001 clarifies that Suwarrow is Crown Land. Today, Suwarrow is under the jurisdiction of the National Environment Service (NES) since 2003, for the primary purpose of conserving, preserving, protecting and managing the natural resources of Suwarrow.

This report outlines the work carried out to control Red Passionfruit (Passiflora Rubra) on the island of Mauke. Treatment methods used in controlling Red Passionfruit on Mauke, monitoring and analysis of data collected throughout the last 2 years were highlighted.

To enhance their conservation value, several hundred islands worldwide have been cleared of invasive alien rats, Rattus spp. One of the largest projects yet undertaken was on 43 km2 Henderson Island in the Pitcairn group, South Pacific, in August 2011. Following massive immediate mortality, a single R. exulans was observed in March 2012 and, subsequently, rat numbers have recovered. The survivors show no sign of resistance to the toxicant used, brodifacoum.

This plan covers the proposed operations to eradicate feral cats (Felis catus) from Malden Island, an uninhabited Wildlife Sanctuary within the southern Line Island group, part of the Republic of Kiribati.

The Ministry of Environment, Lands and Agricultural Development (MELAD) has received funds through

A programme to eradicate two species of myna from Kiribati was carried out between November 2014 and November 2015 by staff of the Environment & Conservation Division, Ministry of Environment, Lands and Agricultural Development with funds through the regional GEF-PAS Invasives project coordinated by UNEP and SPREP, assisted by international consultant Dave Butler.

While eradication projects on large islands require substantial funding and a high level of technical and logistical support, projects on small islands are much simpler and can achieve success with much less funding and outside assistance. The Pacific has thousands of such islands that can contribute to significant biodiversity outcomes. The purpose of this guide is to assist the practitioner in removing invasive rodents from small islands (less than 20 hectares) where access to all parts of the island is possible.

This paper examines how optimal prevention and control policies depend on the economic and biological characteristics of a randomly introduced biological invasion where the objective is to minimise the expected social costs from prevention, control, and invasion damages. The results characterise how optimal prevention and control policies vary with the initial invasion size, the invasion growth rate, and the probability distribution of introductions.