Management Action

During the 45 years that the Raoul Island weed eradication programme has been underway, eleven species have been eradicated. To complete the restoration of Raoul Island’s unique ecosystems supporting signi?cant seabird biodiversity and endemic biota, nine further transformer weeds must be eradicated. In this review of progress to date, we examine the feasibility of eradication of these transformers and identify that four species are on target for eradication: African olive (Olea europaea subsp.

The North American signal cray?sh (Pacifastacus leniusculus) has been present in Scotland since at least 1995 and the species is now known to be present in a number of catchments. Once established, few opportunities for containment exist and eradication can often be impossible to achieve. However, in small, isolated water bodies, the application of a non-cray?sh-speci?c biocide has provided the opportunity to remove this species permanently. In July 2011, signal cray?sh were discovered in a ?ooded quarry pond at Ballachulish in the Scottish Highlands.

In July 2016, the European Union adopted a list of invasive alien species of concern, and at present there are two freshwater ?sh species on the list. Member states are obliged to prevent further spread and to perform rapid eradication when problem species are discovered at new sites, but continental EU member states have limited experience with eradication of ?sh. Eradications are more likely to succeed if the invasive species is con?ned to insular habitats.

The spread of invasive non-native species presents one of the greatest threats to biodiversity globally: invasive species are the primary driver of biodiversity loss on islands and the second largest everywhere else (CBD ; Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, 2005). Many of the UK’s island ecosystems have been damaged by the arrival and establishment of invasive non-native species. Introduced predators have caused particularly catastrophic damage to many species of waders and seabirds, undoubtedly causing numerous extirpations as well as contributing to ongoing declines(Stanbury et al. 2017).

This document builds on lessons learned from 10 years of DEC-MNRE action on the myna issue, training workshops on invasive species management, a 2015 myna population transect survey (conservative estimate of total population in Samoa between 129,407 and 188,583 birds), appropriate literature and experiences in Pacific and other countries. Recommendations are made on strategies and the priority information needed to implement those strategies.

Anticoagulant rodenticides are an important tool for managing rodents by increasing the chances of success and lowering the resources required. This guide was developed to assist non-specialists in gaining a better understanding of the risks, costs, and benefits of using anticoagulant rodenticides. Everyone has a role to play in ensuring that rodenticides are used responsibly and that the risk of negative impacts to people and the environment is minimised. Failure to do so could result in the loss of support for the use of these useful tools.

More than US$21 billion is spent annually on biodiversity conservation. Despite their importance for preventing or slowing extinctions and preserving biodiversity, conservation interventions are rarely assessed systematically for their global impact. Islands house a disproportionately higher amount of biodiversity compared with mainlands, much of which is highly threatened with extinction. Indeed, island species make up nearly two-thirds of recent extinctions. Islands therefore are critical targets of conservation.

Biological control of introduced weeds in the 22 Pacific island countries and territories (PICTs) began in 1911, with the lantana seed-feeding fly introduced into Fiji and New Caledonia from Hawaii. To date, a total of 62 agents have been deliberately introduced into the PICTs to control 21 weed species in 17 countries. A further two agents have spread naturally into the region. The general impact of the 36 biocontrol agents now established in the PICTs ranges from none to complete control of their target weed(s).

Saving Scotland’s Red Squirrels (SSRS), launched in 2009, is a project to stop the decline of core populations of Scotland’s native red squirrel. It is a partnership project between Scottish Wildlife Trust, Scottish Natural Heritage, Forestry Commission Scotland, RSPB Scotland, Scottish Land & Estates and the Red Squirrel Survival Trust. The aim is the containment of the invasive non-native grey squirrel, which poses a dual threat to red squirrels through competition and disease transmission.

In locations with a high potential for re-invasion, such as inshore islands, sustained control of invasive species is as important as the initial knock-down for the long-term recovery of native populations. However, ongoing trap maintenance and lure replenishment are barriers to minimising the time and financial costs of long-term suppression, even when automatic traps are used.