Invasive Plants

The 2017-2019 Interim Guam Invasive Species Management Plan (GISMP) expresses the overarching goals and priorities of the Guam Invasive Species Council (GISC or Council). The Guam Invasive Species Act of 2011 (Public Law 31-43) established the Council as Guam’s lead entity in coordinating with local, regional, national, and international jurisdic¬tions in the fight against alien invasive species. Although the GISC is in its infancy stages of organization, it draws from the collective knowledge, past research, and progress of its members in establishing the Council’s goals and priorities.

This NAP communicates adaptation efforts across multiple government entities together under one document. The NAP influences and accelerates the national development pathway towards climate-resilient development. It seeks to improve resilience against changes in climate but also climate variability which will also increase under future scenarios.

Invasive alien plants and animals are known for their disruption of ecosystems and threat to biodiversity. This book highlights their major impact on human health. This includes not only direct effects through contact with the species via bites, wounds and disease, but also indirect effects caused by changes induced in ecosystems by invasive species, such as more water hyacinth increasing mosquito levels and thereby the potential for malaria.

Invasive alien species represent an insidious and pervasive threat to the environmental, economic and human well-being of the Pacific islands. Pacific island ecosystems make up one of the world’s important biodiversity hotspots, with high numbers of endemic species that are particularly vulnerable to extinction due to their limited habitat and isolation.

ARMENTANO. T.V.; DOREN, R.F.; PLATT, W.J., and MULLINS, T., 1995. Effects of Hurricane Andrew on coastal and interior forests of southern Florida: Overview and synthesis. Journal of Coastal Research, SI No. 21, pp. 111-144. Fort Lauderdale (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. The effects of Hurrican Andrew upn the forests of south Florida as of early 1994 are summarized from studies conducted at sites located within the track of the storm as it passed across the peninsula. Updated information on the storm's track and eyewall configuration also is provided.

Merremia peltata, disturbance ecology, tropical cyclones and Samoa. The biology and ecology of Merremia peltata are not well understood. While some regard the species as an exotic invader of Pacific Island ecosystems (Meyer. 2000). others identify