Hawaii

Strangers in Paradise takes us on a discovery journey to identify and learn about various species living on the islands of Hawaii, Solomon Islands, Rarotonga, New Zealand, and Easter Island. In contrast, we also take a look at the impact of human development on such species. The introduction of rats and new predators had devastating effects on these, which prompted research into control measures to address this problem.

The Brown Tree Snake (Boiga irregularis) has caused ecological and economic damage to Guam, and the snake has the potential to colonize other islands in the Paci c Ocean. This study quanti es the potential economic damage if the snake were translocated, established in the state of Hawai‘i, and causing damage at levels similar to those on Guam. Damages modeled included costs of medical treatments due to snakebites, snake-caused power outages, and decreased tourism resulting from effects of the snake.

The giant African snail, Achatina fulica Bowdich, one of the most destructive molluscan pests of many tropical areas of the world, became established in Hawaii November 30, 1936. To control this pest predaceous snails, Gonaxis quadrilateralis (Preston), G. kibweziensis (E. A. Smith), and Euglandina rosea (Ferussac) were introduced. According the Davis, the population of A. Fulica has declined markedly in recent years and numerous empty shells have been observed in many areas of Oahu.