global

Invasive plants and animals inflict much damage on native species and this is particularly the case on isolated oceanic islands with high degrees of endemism. Such islands commonly are important refugia for species of high conservation value. Some of the most pervasive and potent of invasive animal species are birds of the myna (Acridotheres) and bulbul (Pycnonotus) genera that historically were introduced to isolated islands as biological control agents for the management of insect pest species that can cause considerable economic damage to agricultural crops and wider ecosystems.

International Symposium on, Managing vertebrate invasive species. August 7-9, 2007, Hilton Fort Collins, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.

The book presents an analysis of the ecological, economic and social threats posed by the introduction and spread of non-native species. It provides a comprehensive description of impacts of non-native species from all five kingdoms of life across all ecosystems of the world. New insights into the impacts arising from biological invasions are generated through taking an ecosystem services perspective.

Attempts to eradicate invasive terrestrial arthropods are often regarded as gambles. They o?er the possibility of long term freedom from a pest but are usually confronted with substantial uncertainty and come with a range of technical, economic, environmental, social and political risks. Few guidelines are available for evaluating eradication attempts against terrestrial arthropods.

The EU regulation 1143/2014 “On the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species” entered into force on 1 January 2015. On 13 July 2016, the EU list of invasive alien species that require action was adopted. The list includes ?ve di?erent cray?sh species. Member states will be required to take measures for early detection and rapid eradication of these species. Except for some eradications performed in the United Kingdom and Norway, there has not been much e?ort put into eradication of invasive cray?sh species throughout Europe.

Recent years have seen large increases in the number and size of successful invasive species eradications from islands. There is also a long history of large scale removals on larger land-masses. These programmes for mammals and terrestrial plants follow the same cost-area relationship although spanning 10 orders of magnitude in scale. Eradication can be readily defined in island situations but can be more complex on larger land-masses where uncertainties defining the extent of a population, multiple population centres on the same land-mass and ongoing risks of immigration are commonplace.