Foundations-Legislation

A workshop was held for members and partners of the Palau National Invasive Species Committee (NISC) from March 26-28, 2013, with the purpose of drafting a strategic action plan (SAP). Workshop participants initially carried out a review of the goals and objectives of the previous NISC action plan (2007-10). The goals were then revised, and a new goal, Goal 6, was adopted, to ensure that activities in the plan are adequately resourced.

Invasive species pose one of the greatest ecological threats to America’s lands and waters. Their control can be complex and expensive and is often conducted in perpetuity; their harm can be irreversible. Early detection and rapid response (EDRR) actions can reduce the long-term costs and economic burden that invasive species have on communities.

Pacilic island countries are particularly vulnerable to the effects of invasive species. After habitat destruction or modification, invasive species are responsible for more species extinctions than any other cause. Further, the rate of extinction of native species has been higher on islands than anywhere else in the world. Invasive species have also degraded native ecosystems.

The Cook Islands signed the Convention on Biological Diversity at the Earth Summit in 1992. As a Party to the Convention, the Cook Islands Government committed itself and its people to conserve its biodiversity, to use it in a sustainable manner, and to share its benefits in an equitable manner. It also committed itself to control invasive species (the weeds and pest animals in natural ecosystems and agricultural systems), and to reduce the likelihood of future invasions.

An act to amend the marine pollution Act 1992 to update the Act and to ensure that there is compliance with current marine pollution related convention, and for related purposes

This document builds on lessons learned from 10 years of DEC-MNRE action on the myna issue, training workshops on invasive species management, a 2015 myna population transect survey (conservative estimate of total population in Samoa between 129,407 and 188,583 birds), appropriate literature and experiences in Pacific and other countries. Recommendations are made on strategies and the priority information needed to implement those strategies.

As we experienced with the Taro Leaf Blight outbreak in the 1990s, the introduction of exotic pests or diseases into Samoa can have disasterous effects on our people and on our economy.