Foundations-Generating Support

Work is based around country visits by the network coordinator to support PILN teams to identify and take strategic action to manage their priority invasive species. The network is functioning by sharing awareness of successful activities being earned out by the teams, providing the mechanism for other teams to do the same, and actively encouraging them to do so.

It may be possible to tell that a species is likely to be invasive, for example because it has been a problem elsewhere. However it will be difficult to say with certainty that a

Invasive alien species represent an insidious and pervasive threat to the environmental, economic and human well-being of the Pacific islands. Pacific island ecosystems make up one of the world’s important biodiversity hotspots, with high numbers of endemic species that are particularly vulnerable to extinction due to their limited habitat and isolation.

The aim of this toolkit is to provide a clear, user-friendly guide to the application of economic approaches and tools to invasive species. It addresses the issues associated with identifying the factors which cause the spread of invasives, incorporating consideration of invasive species into economic planning and

The West Coast Ballast Outreach Project works collaboratively with partnering organizations throughout the West Coast and Pacific Basin in the development of outreach programs and tools to manage aquatic invasive species (AIS) and ballast water issues. Initiated in 1999 and funded by the National Sea Grant College Program and the CALFED Bay-Delta Program, the project places a priority on facilitating communication and cooperation between private industry, regulators, and researchers concerned with ballast water and AIS management.

Invasive species are plants or animals living where they don’t belong and causing harm.