Foundations

Invasive species are a major global threat to biodiversity and Pacific Islands are particularly vulnerable due to their isolation and relatively recent human occupation. Their native species often cannot cope with predation or competition from new arrivals. Niue already suffers from the impact of invasive species that have arrive in the country. However there are many more devastating species that are not present but found in other countries of the region and every effort needs to be made to prevent their arrivals.

Information document on GEF-6 Project Identification Form (PIF) - Building Capacities to Address Invasive Alien Species to Enhance the Chances of Long-term Survival of Terrestrial Endemic and Threatened Species on Taveuni Island and Surrounding Islets

The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the various frameworks and initiatives that exist in the Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs) with regards to invasive species management and how they could be utilised towards the development of a coordinated mechanism by the countries in the Melanesian region in addressing biosecurity and invasive species concerns. The terms of reference for this report can be seen in Annex 1.

An act to amend the marine pollution Act 1992 to update the Act and to ensure that there is compliance with current marine pollution related convention, and for related purposes

This is a summary of New Caledonia's Strategy for Invasive Alien Species that threaten natural ecosystems which was endorsed by the governing board of the Conservatoire d'espaces naturels (CEN) at the end of 2016. This summary was produced to raise awareness amongst New Calendonians and visitors of the priority actions that have been developed at the territory level and the urgent need for cooperative action to address this major threat to the country.

Education and awareness are important steps to ensuring the issue with invasive species is well

The first and second editions of the Handbook, on which this Pacific version is substantially based, were prepared as a practical introduction to negotiating or working on Mulitlateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs). They were prepared for people with little or no technical background in negotiations.They were also intended to function as a key reference tool for experienced negotiators. As a result the subject matter is developed at a relatively broad level.

The West Coast Ballast Outreach Project works collaboratively with partnering organizations throughout the West Coast and Pacific Basin in the development of outreach programs and tools to manage aquatic invasive species (AIS) and ballast water issues. Initiated in 1999 and funded by the National Sea Grant College Program and the CALFED Bay-Delta Program, the project places a priority on facilitating communication and cooperation between private industry, regulators, and researchers concerned with ballast water and AIS management.