extinction

Climate change is expected to cause extinctions when native plants and animals are prevented from migrating out of their hotter or drier habitats to more suitable climates. But for many species a more

We assessed the prevalence of alien species as a driver of recent extinctions in five major taxa (plants, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals), using data from the IUCN Red List. Our results show that alien species are the second most common threat associated with species that have gone completely extinct from these taxa since AD 1500. Aliens are the most common threat associated with extinctions in three of the five taxa analysed, and for vertebrate extinctions overall.

Assessing species' vulnerability to climate change is a prerequisite for developing effective strategies to conserve them. The last three decades have seen exponential growth in the number of studies evaluating how, how much, why, when, and where species will be impacted by climate change. We provide an overview of the rapidly developing field of climate change vulnerability assessment (CCVA) and describe key concepts, terms, steps and considerations.

The Kuramoo, or Blue Lorikeet (Vini peruviana), is listed by IUCN as threatened. Formerly, the species was widespread on the Society and Tuamotu ISlands, but it became extinct on Tahiti, Moorea and other large islands in the Society Group early this century and is now also extinct on many other islands on which it once occurred. Today, in French Polynesia, it apparently survives only on two small islands in the Society Group and several in the Tuamotu Group.

The Hanamiai archaeological site (Tahuata, Marquesas Islands) has yielded a strati ed assemblage of bird bones