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Invasive species are of signi?cant concern, especially in mega-diverse countries, because they cause negative e?ects such as loss of native biodiversity, ecological alterations, disease spread, and impacts on economic development and human health. In mainland Ecuador, information on invasive invertebrates in marine ecosystems is scarce. The objective of this study was to describe and locate the invasive species present in the rocky shores of the intertidal and subtidal zones along 10 areas (83 sites) covering most of the Ecuadorian coast during 2015–2016.

The bird-parasitic ?y, Philornis downsi, was ?rst recorded in the Galápagos Islands in 1964 where it likely invaded from mainland Ecuador. This muscid ?y is now the leading cause of recent declines in endemic landbird populations as its larvae feed on the nestlings of at least 19 bird species in the Galápagos, including many species of Darwin’s ?nches. As yet, no long-term control method has been implemented for P. downsi, but importation (also known as classical) biological control may be a viable option.

Eradication of invasive rodents has become a powerful tool to protect native island biota. Use of brodifacoum, an anticoagulant rodenticide, has contributed to hundreds of successful invasive rodent eradication e?orts on islands. Application of bait containing brodifacoum for this purpose requires appropriate consideration of adverse e?ects on non-target wildlife. Thus, a priori identi?cation of non-target risks and, where needed, approaches to mitigate these to acceptable levels, is now an essential component of eradication planning and implementation.