Climate change

This booklet is an outcome of a Climate Change and Health symposium organized by the core working group of the Piloting Climate Change Adaptation to Protect Human Health project in Fiji. The views expressed in the document by named authors are solely the responsibility of the named authors. Referencing and quote from this booklet should be acknowledged accordingly. It is a product of Ministry of Health & Medical Services -Fiji, MOHMS Fiji and World Health Organization, WHO collaboration.

Climate change is one of the greatest ecological, economic, and social challenges facing us today. The scientific evidence that human activities are contributing to climate change is compelling, but society is increasingly seeking information about the nature of the evidence and what can be done in response to a changing climate. This book provides some of that much-needed information from some of Australia's leading climate scientists.

Millions of people are crowded along the coastal fringes of continents, attracted by rich fertile land, transport connections, port access, coastal and deep-sea fishing, and recreational opportunities. In addition, significant populations live on oceanic islands with elevations of only a few meters. Many of the world's megacities, cities with populations of many millions, are situated at the coast, and new costal infrastructure developments worth billions of dollars are being undertaken in many countries.

THE ENERGY CHOICES WE MAKE TODAY ARE resulting in changes in the amount of carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere that will be seen in the composition of the atmosphere for hundreds of thousands of years. Climate change is here; it’s happening and going to be with us for thousands of years.

The Implementation Plan, is the companion document to the Living with Change: An integrated national strategy for enhancing the resilience of Tokelau to climate change and related hazards, 2017-2030 (LivC). It provides an overview of how implementation of LivC will occur during the first five years.

Landscape conservation, and management of protected areas in particular, needs leadership, knowledge, practical skills, science, innovation, creativity and collaboration.

Within the context of an additional commitment of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) for the ongoing ACCPIR Project GTZ commissioned an appraisal mission in order to investigate the options for extending it regionally and thematically. The regional scope of the mission includes all independent member states of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC).

Since the early 1990s the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) has been promoting the use of environmental planning and assessment processes amongst its member countries and territories. SPREP's approach to environmental planning and assessment has been part of a global programme for improving environmental management and supporting sustainable development.

Fiji’s marine ecosystems are worth FJ$2.5 billion per year—exceeding the country’s total export value. We are strongly committed to sustaining these values to build an equitable and prosperous blue economy

This island nation contains many marine eco-systems, from globally significant coral reefs to mangroves, seagrass areas, seamounts and deep-sea trenches supporting at least 769 fish species, including sharks and rays, as well as whales, dolphins and sea turtles.