Battler series

Many invasive plants are successful by producing large numbers of seeds easily transported by wind, water and animals. However invasions are started almost exclusively through the actions of people.

A weed is any plant that is in the wrong place and requires action to reduce its effect on the economy, environment, human health or amenity. Weeds are also known as invasive plants.

We are a diverse bunch of people in the Pacific region, which spans about one third of the earth's surface and encompasses about half of the global sea surface. Natural enemies can be used to restore natural balance between weeds and the environment by introducing the enemies where they are needed.

The “Invasive Species Battler” series has been developed to share what we have learned about common invasive species issues in the region. They are not intended to cover each issue in depth but to provide information and case-studies that can assist you to make a decision about what to do next or where to go for further information.

National or Territory Invasive Species Strategies and Action Plans (NISSAP) are a critical document to ensure invasive species management is coordinated within a country or territory and that the different sectors involved with invasive species management are working together toward the same goals. NISSAP are essential to show political will for managing invasive species and are looked upon favourably by funding bodies.

Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) systems are the first line of defence against invasive species once they have penetrated national or inter-island biosecurity systems. For these systems to be effective, a plan is required to coordinate the responsible agencies and ensure both the systems and equipment to address the detected species are in place prior to the response. Several countries have developed these plans recently, which are available on the Battler Resource Base. SPREP thanks James Stanford, who drafted the text for this guide.

The invasive battler has a difficult job. Many of the management solutions for invasive species require a broad base of information to determine the best way to approach an issue and determine if the approach is feasible. Likely questions a battler will face are: what is that species? How did it get here and where will it go next? Is it a risk to our environment or other important national asset? Where else is this species found and what did they do about it?

Experience shows that you can get rid of myna while their population is small, but once the population becomes widespread, ongoing management will be required if the impacts of myna are to be reduced. This guide offers solutions and advice on how to decide what to do if myna are an issue in your country and was prepared by David Butler and Bill Nagle, who have assisted Pacific countries with myna solutions for both goals of eradication and control.