australia

Cane toads introduced to Queensland in 1935, are major environmental pests in Western Australia, having arrived here in February 2009. The Liberal National Government released a 10-year Cane Toad Strategy for Western Australia in 2009. Over the first five years of the strategy, much has been achieved and the government has invested more than $7.8 million in on –ground activities and research to help control the spread of can toads.

4 page Fact sheet provides general information to background history, description of Cane Toad in different life stages, why they are invasive pest, and control actvities

4 page Fact sheet provides general information to background history, disribution, behavior, description of Cane Toad in different life stages, why they are invasive pest, and control actvities; The Australian Government cane toad commitment is providing more than $2 million over two years (2008-09 to 2009-10) to reduce the impacts of cane toads and to develop a national cane toad plan.

Once an island vertebrate eradication is deemed successful, it is typically assumed that ecosystem recovery will follow. To date, most post-eradication monitoring focuses on the recovery of key threatened or charismatic species, such as seabirds. Little attention has been given to monitoring and quantifying the response of invertebrate communities. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), house mice (Mus musculus), and ship rats (Rattus rattus) impacted sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island for over 140 years, with wide ranging ecosystem impacts.

In tropical forests, natural disturbance creates opportunities for species to claim previously utilized space and resources and is considered an important mechanism in the maintenance of species diversity. However, ecologists have long recognized that disturbance also promotes exotic plant invasions. Cyclones cause extensive defoliation, loss of major branches and multiple tree falls, resulting in a significantly more open canopy and increased light and heat levels in the understorey.

Invasive species compete with endemic species and if successful can displace native species in the host region (Cororaton et al., 2009).

Barrow Island, north-west coast of Australia, is one of the world’s significant conservation areas, harboring marsupials that have become extinct or threatened on mainland Australia as well as a rich diversity of plants and animals, some endemic. Access to construct a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) plant, Australia’s largest infrastructure development, on the island was conditional on no non-indigenous species (NIS) becoming established. We developed a comprehensive biosecurity system to protect the island’s biodiversity.