Ants

Invasive ants are a diverse group of aggressive, competitive, dominating ant species that can rapidly establish and spread. Several ant species are amongst the most serious global invasive species. Their broad diets, nesting habits, ability to breed rapidly, high densitites and adaptibility to varied habitats make them excellent invaders. Agricultural economic, environmental and social wellbeing are threatened by these ants, many of which have been introduced to, and established in, many countries

We conducted ant surveys on Santa Cruz Island, the largest of the California Channel Islands, in 1975/6, 1984, 1993 and 1998. Our surveys yielded a combined total of 34 different ant species: Brachymyrmex cf. depilis, Camponotus anthrax, C. clarithorax, C. hyatti, C. semitestaceus, C. vicinus, C. sp. near vicinus, C. yogi, Cardiocondyla ectopia, Crematogaster californica, C. hespera, C. marioni, C. mormonum, Dorymyrmex bicolor, D. insanus (s.l.), Formica lasioides, F. moki, Hypoponera opacior, Leptothorax andrei, L.

Invasive species are one of the most serious threats to biodiversity. Up-to-date and accurate information on the distribution of invasive species is an important biosecurity risk analysis tool. Several databases are available to determine the distributions of invasive species and native species. However, keeping this information current is a real challenge. Ants are among the most widespread invasive species. Five species of ants are listed in the IUCN list of damaging invasive species, and many other species are also invasive in the Pacific.