Invasive species - Management - Samoa

Although a monograph, or series of papers, dealing comprehensively with the land arthropod fauna of any group of islands in the South Pacific may be expected to yield valuable results, in connection with distribution, modification due to isolation, and other problems, no such work is at present in existence.

To determine the top 20 manageable invasive plants in Samoa and to then prioritises the work that needs to be done to manage them effectively. The workshop will aim:

The Aleipata islands are considered to be of great regional conservation significance because they are uninhabited (with the exception of Namua), relatively pristine as forest ecosystems, hosting many species threatened throughout the greater Samoa, and still not invaded by most invasive alien species (IAS) present within Upolu main island. Due to this reason they were included in the list of the 7 key biodiversity areas of Samoa (Conservation International et al. 2010).

The Aleipata Marine Protected (MPA) Management Plan is a partnership between the Government of Samoa and all the villages of the District of Aleipata. Both partners have responsibility for the continuous implementation of this Plan which highlights a collaborative approach to the sustainable use and protection of the Marine resources and environment in the District.

This report describes the results of the simulation exercise carried out to test the understandability, relevance, practicality and effectiveness of the Samoa Invasive Species Emergency Response Plan (SISERP) to invasive species emergencies. The exercise was conducted on June 26, 2015 at the MAF Crops Research Centre at Nu'u. A hypothetical invasive species outbreak of the Little Fire Ant (Wasmannia auropunctata) was simulated in the exercise.