Environment - Protection - Samoa

Nuutele Island hosts a diverse range of plant species, significant populations of land and seabirds, fruit bats, coconut crabs and turtles. It is a small island with a total land mass of about 108ha and located south east of Upolu Island at 1.8km off the Aleipata coast. It is an important offshore island on this part of Samoa because not only does it hold a diversity of species but one of the first islands to include or part of a Marine Protected Area.

The second pig’s eradication was a follow up activity of the first eradication as it was reported that there are still more pigs on the island that needs to be cleared off. It is a concern to remove pigs from the island because of the high risk that lies ahead on human health from the toxic bait that will kill the rats during the rat eradication operation when pigs consume this toxic bait.

The Pacific islands of Oceania cover almost 15% of the world’s surface and are characterised by a high degree of ecosystem and species diversity. The region is characterised by thousands of isolated small coral atolls and higher volcanic islands, which has led to the high diversity of species found today. In fact, the number of plants and animals found nowhere else on earth (endemic species) is extremely high - often up to 90% for particular groups. Often, these rare and endemic species are adapted to specialised habitats and limited to small areas of a few islands.

The Pacific islands of Oceania cover almost 15% of the world’s surface and are characterised by a high degree of ecosystem and species diversity. The region is characterised by thousands of isolated small coral atolls and higher volcanic islands, which has led to the high diversity of species found today. In fact, the number of plants and animals found nowhere else on earth (endemic species) is extremely high - often up to 90% for particular groups. Often, these rare and endemic species are adapted to specialised habitats and limited to small areas of a few islands.

The Pacific islands of Oceania cover almost 15% of the world’s surface and are characterised by a high degree of ecosystem and species diversity. The region is characterised by thousands of isolated small coral atolls and higher volcanic islands, which has led to the high diversity of species found today. In fact, the number of plants and animals found nowhere else on earth (endemic species) is extremely high - often up to 90% for particular groups. Often, these rare and endemic species are adapted to specialised habitats and limited to small areas of a few islands.

Samoa’s rich cultural heritage and future prosperity depends on a healthy environment. Over the past 50 years, Samoa’s environment has been pressured by increasing population and development, agricultural expansion, invasive species of plants and animals, and disasters such as tsunamis, cyclones, and fi res. Each of these threatens the health of our environment, thereby threatening the wellbeing of Samoan people and Fa Samoa – our traditional way of life

This is a continuation of the survey of islands in Micronesia and American Samoa for invasive plant species requested by the Pacific Islands Committee, Council of Western State Foresters. A survey of selected Micronesian islands was conducted in 1998 and was discussed in a previous report2. This report is based on perceptions gained from a trip to American Samoa from 16 to 23 July 1999, including the islands of Tutuila, Ofu, Olosega and Ta'u.