New Zealand

Common mynas have been introduced (often as biocontrol for insects) or colonised many islands in the Pacific. They are one cause of decline in some native bird species such as endemic kingfishers, and are a pest when they damage fruit and compete for food to put out for domestic animals.

The Kuramoo, or Blue Lorikeet (Vini peruviana), is listed by IUCN as threatened. Formerly, the species was widespread on the Society and Tuamotu ISlands, but it became extinct on Tahiti, Moorea and other large islands in the Society Group early this century and is now also extinct on many other islands on which it once occurred. Today, in French Polynesia, it apparently survives only on two small islands in the Society Group and several in the Tuamotu Group.

This document builds on lessons learned from 10 years of DEC-MNRE action on the myna issue, training workshops on invasive species management, a 2015 myna population transect survey (conservative estimate of total population in Samoa between 129,407 and 188,583 birds), appropriate literature and experiences in Pacific and other countries. Recommendations are made on strategies and the priority information needed to implement those strategies.

It is important to recall that Madagascar is a country of exceptional biodiversity worldwide. For example, among the 300 species of amphibians reported, the rate of endemism is nearly 100%. The recent incursion of the invasive Asian toad constitutes a direct threat to this unique biodiversity but also to human health and the country's economy. We suspect the toads impact may be comparable to the Cane toad in Australia; we must act swiftly to prevent a similar disaster unfolding in Madagascar.

Invasive species pose an enormous threat in the Pacific: not only do they strongly affect biodiversity, but they also potentially affect the economic, social and cultural wellbeing of Pacific peoples. Invasive species can potentially be managed and their impacts can potentially be avoided, eliminated, or reduced. However, neither the costs nor the numerous benefits of management are well understood in the Pacific.

During the 1970's village people in the Temotu province of the Solomon Islands complained to Provincial and Central Government authorities about rat damage to garden and plantation crops and household commodities.