Hawaii

The Brown Tree Snake (Boiga irregularis) has caused ecological and economic damage to Guam, and the snake has the potential to colonize other islands in the Paci c Ocean. This study quanti es the potential economic damage if the snake were translocated, established in the state of Hawai‘i, and causing damage at levels similar to those on Guam. Damages modeled included costs of medical treatments due to snakebites, snake-caused power outages, and decreased tourism resulting from effects of the snake.

The giant African snail, Achatina fulica Bowdich, one of the most destructive molluscan pests of many tropical areas of the world, became established in Hawaii November 30, 1936. To control this pest predaceous snails, Gonaxis quadrilateralis (Preston), G. kibweziensis (E. A. Smith), and Euglandina rosea (Ferussac) were introduced. According the Davis, the population of A. Fulica has declined markedly in recent years and numerous empty shells have been observed in many areas of Oahu.

The Plant Pest Control Branch (formerly Entomology Branch) of the Hawaii Department of Agriculture has maintained a beneficial organism introduction program for many years. This paper provides notes on the status of some pests and their purposely introduced natural enemies and a list of insects introduced and released for biological control during 1979 and 1980. All beneficial introductions are thoroughly screened and studied in a quarantine facility and must go through a clearance process prior to being released.

Land snails of the genus Partula, inhabiting the high islands of the Pacific Ocean, have provided exceptional opportunities for studies on the origin and differentiation of species. The endemic taxa of Moorea, in French Polynesia, have been particularly well studied.

This paper is a report on a collection of plants made during an 11-month stay in Samoa, from August to November 1929, and from June 1931 to January 1932, and on other Samoan collections of plants in Bernice.

18 abstracts from the symposium, 30 May 1991, Honolulu Hawaii, XVII Pacific Science Congress - on introduced alien species and their impacts on Pacific island ecosystems and biodiversity.