Hawaii

This paper is a report on a collection of plants made during an 11-month stay in Samoa, from August to November 1929, and from June 1931 to January 1932, and on other Samoan collections of plants in Bernice.

18 abstracts from the symposium, 30 May 1991, Honolulu Hawaii, XVII Pacific Science Congress - on introduced alien species and their impacts on Pacific island ecosystems and biodiversity.

This paper develops a model of invasive species control when the species’ population size is unknown. In the face of an uncertain

The Brown Tree Snake (Boiga irregularis) has caused ecological and economic damage to Guam, and the snake has the potential to colonize other islands in the Paci c Ocean. This study quanti es the potential economic damage if the snake were translocated, established in the state of Hawai‘i, and causing damage at levels similar to those on Guam. Damages modeled included costs of medical treatments due to snakebites, snake-caused power outages, and decreased tourism resulting from effects of the snake.

The Prevention and Management of Invasive Species: Forging Cooperation throughout the Austral Pacific

The botany of four small, relatively undisturbed tuff cone islands off the east coast of Upolu, Western Samoa, is examined. During a series of visits to the islands, the vegetation was studied in nine sample plots, and a checklist of the 260 species comprising the flora was compiled. Six types of native vegetation are recognized, one of which (Diospyros coastal forest) appears to be unique to tuff cone islands. Casual observations were made on the avifauna and turtle

The giant African snail, Achatina fulica Bowdich, one of the most destructive molluscan pests of many tropical areas of the world, became established in Hawaii November 30, 1936. To control this pest predaceous snails, Gonaxis quadrilateralis (Preston), G. kibweziensis (E. A. Smith), and Euglandina rosea (Ferussac) were introduced. According the Davis, the population of A. Fulica has declined markedly in recent years and numerous empty shells have been observed in many areas of Oahu.