Report

Invasive species is one of the greatest threats to Samoa's biodiversity, it damages habitat for native plants and animals, loss of subsistence resources, economic loss especially the health of people. Invasive species could be anything that is introduced to a certain area, thus cause negative impacts to the environment as a whole.

SPREP’s direction in the Islands Ecosystems Programme reflects a fundamental commitment to sustaining the livelihoods of Island peoples today and tomorrow by supporting ecosystem management and species conservation. The Programme focuses on developing the capacities of the peoples of the islands to equip them to sustainably manage and conserve the terrestrial, coastal and marine ecosystems of their islands.

It may be possible to tell that a species is likely to be invasive, for example because it has been a problem elsewhere. However it will be difficult to say with certainty that a

The effects of alien invasive species on biodiversity have been described as “immense, insidious and usually irreversible” (IUCN 2000). There is no doubt that invasive species can cause severe economic and ecological damage (Mack et al. 2000). They may soon surpass habitat loss as the main cause of ecological disintegration globally (Vitousek et al. 1997, Chapin et al. 2000) and are probably already the main cause of extinctions in island ecosystems.

Many governments are actively encouraging private investment in biofuels developments to harness the perceived benefits of biofuels such as agricultural development, increased energy security and independence, improved balance of trade and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, in the rush to pursue the benefits of biofuels, the risks of invasion by introduced species have received little or no attention and are not being adequately prevented or managed. The situation is most acute in countries lacking the capacity and resources to adequately avoid and manage the risks of invasion.