Report

Invasive species is one of the greatest threats to Samoa's biodiversity, it damages habitat for native plants and animals, loss of subsistence resources, economic loss especially the health of people. Invasive species could be anything that is introduced to a certain area, thus cause negative impacts to the environment as a whole.

SPREP’s direction in the Islands Ecosystems Programme reflects a fundamental commitment to sustaining the livelihoods of Island peoples today and tomorrow by supporting ecosystem management and species conservation. The Programme focuses on developing the capacities of the peoples of the islands to equip them to sustainably manage and conserve the terrestrial, coastal and marine ecosystems of their islands.

Many ant species that have been accidentally spread throughout the world have significant economic, environmental and social impacts in areas that they now infest. One of the most notable invasive ants is the Yellow crazy ant, A. gracilipes, and this species is present in Samoa, including on the Aleipata islands. The Aleipata islands are considered to be of great regional conservation significance because they are uninhabited, relatively pristine, contain many species threatened throughout greater Samoa, and lack many exotic species present within greater Samoa. The presence of A.

The Samoan islands of Nuutele and Nuulua from part of the Aleipata Marine Protected Area, in recognition of their contribution to biological diversity in Samoa. In a 1986 review of 226 islands in the South Pacific region, these islands together rated 30th in importance for biological diversity. The islands provide essential habitat for a reange of sea birds, bats and land birds such as the rare friendly ground dove, sea turtles, shell fish and other marine life.

An outbreak of the crown of thorn starfish (Acanthaster planci) was observed in a number of villages after the 2009 tsunami. The Division of Environment and Conservation (DEC) of Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MNRE) and the Fisheries Division of the Ministry of Agriculture worked with the communities to collect the starfish mainly from the areas along the south and southeast coast of Upolu Island. This activity was undertaken to remove the majority of the COTs to reduce the impacts on the reef.

Myna birds are now found at high population around Samoa. They were at sight everywhere but seem more frequent around people's compounds and personal properties as well. Upon completion of the 9th poison baiting operation, the team conducted its 10th phase of baiting operation in Savaii for two weeks. This work marked as the second control work to be done in the big island.

Indian myna birds were introduced in Samoa within different periods for such reasons as to control cattle ticks. They have now spread to most parts of two main habitat islands of Samoa, Upolu and Savaii. The two introduced species of myna have now been commonly known as the Common Myna and the Jungle Myna.

The Vanuatu Government has, with support from JICA, initiated a project to refurbish an expland Lapetasi Wharf in Port Vila (Port Vila Lapetasi International Multi-Purpose Wharf). The aim is to increase the country's capacity to deal with international freight and cruise ship tourism. The development entails construction of a new multi-purpose wharf facility of ~200m that is capable of berthing two large vessels at the same time.