Report

It may be possible to tell that a species is likely to be invasive, for example because it has been a problem elsewhere. However it will be difficult to say with certainty that a

The effects of alien invasive species on biodiversity have been described as “immense, insidious and usually irreversible” (IUCN 2000). There is no doubt that invasive species can cause severe economic and ecological damage (Mack et al. 2000). They may soon surpass habitat loss as the main cause of ecological disintegration globally (Vitousek et al. 1997, Chapin et al. 2000) and are probably already the main cause of extinctions in island ecosystems.

Many governments are actively encouraging private investment in biofuels developments to harness the perceived benefits of biofuels such as agricultural development, increased energy security and independence, improved balance of trade and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, in the rush to pursue the benefits of biofuels, the risks of invasion by introduced species have received little or no attention and are not being adequately prevented or managed. The situation is most acute in countries lacking the capacity and resources to adequately avoid and manage the risks of invasion.

Invasive species (non-native, harmful organisms) undermine human health and safety, food and water security, and economic development. Consequently, invasive species can have significant socio-economic impacts and warrant attention as a public policy priority. Trade and travel are the primary drivers of biological invasion both into and within the United States and prevention measures have been identified as the most cost-effective means of minimizing the introduction and thus impact of invasive species.

Kiritimati (Line Islands, Kiribati) supports globally important populations of many seabird species including the largest breeding populations of two threatened species – Te ruru (Phoenix petrel, Pterodroma alba; Endangered) and Te bwebwe ni marawa (whitethroated storm-petrel, Nesofregetta fuliginosa; Vulnerable). These and other seabirds and one landbird species are increasingly being threated by an increasing human population (5000+) and the impacts of mammalian pests, including the recent arrival of black rats (Rattus rattus).

Invasive species pose one of the greatest ecological threats to America’s lands and waters. Their control can be complex and expensive and is often conducted in perpetuity; their harm can be irreversible. Early detection and rapid response (EDRR) actions can reduce the long-term costs and economic burden that invasive species have on communities.

Invasvie Species Project, Tiaea Progress Report on identifying cuscuta.

This programme was initiated to upgrade a vacant room within one of the buildings at the Ministry of Agricultre for the purpose of rearing natural enemies for bio-control programmes.

NES in collaboration with the Integrated Island Biodiversity (IIB) Project and the Invasive Alien Species (IAS) Project launched the theme for our 2014 campaign - E Tango Maori te Ao Ora Natura: Our Islands, Our Biodiversity, Our Future - in January via TV interview, newspaper article and advertisement.

The Global Invasive Species Database is a free, online searchable source of information about alien and invasive species that negatively impact biodiversity. The GISD aims to increase public awareness about invasive species and to facilitate effective prevention and management activities by disseminating specialist?s knowledge and experience to a broad global audience. It focuses on invasive alien species that threaten native biodiversity and natural areas and covers all taxonomic groups from micro-organisms to animals and plants.