Report

The second pig’s eradication was a follow up activity of the first eradication as it was reported that there are still more pigs on the island that needs to be cleared off. It is a concern to remove pigs from the island because of the high risk that lies ahead on human health from the toxic bait that will kill the rats during the rat eradication operation when pigs consume this toxic bait.

The biodiversity of the Solomon Islands, in general, is in good health. Low human population density, uninhabited islands, difficulties to access and use natural resources, and customary and legal protection, in various ways, can help explain this. Threats to the country’s biodiversity are mainly localized and vary across islands, biomes, ecosystems, corridors and taxonomy. In recent years habitat destruction and overexploitation of wildlife has had enormous pressure on all types of biomes.

The Prevention and Management of Invasive Species: Forging Cooperation throughout the Austral Pacific

Life on Earth is disappearing fast and will continue to do so unless urgent action is taken. Well designed and effectively managed systems of protected areas are a vital tool for reducing biodiversity loss while delivering environmental goods and services that underpin sustainable development. There are currently over 130,000 protected areas worldwide, covering around 13.9 % of the Earth’s land surface and 5.9 % of the territorial marine surface. These areas represent a tremendous resource for conserving biodiversity and for protecting vital ecosystem services.

Kiritimati (Line Islands, Kiribati) supports globally important populations of many seabird species including the largest breeding populations of two threatened species – Te ruru (Phoenix petrel, Pterodroma alba; Endangered) and Te bwebwe ni marawa (whitethroated storm-petrel, Nesofregetta fuliginosa; Vulnerable). These and other seabirds and one landbird species are increasingly being threated by an increasing human population (5000+) and the impacts of mammalian pests, including the recent arrival of black rats (Rattus rattus).

NES in collaboration with the Integrated Island Biodiversity (IIB) Project and the Invasive Alien Species (IAS) Project launched the theme for our 2014 campaign - E Tango Maori te Ao Ora Natura: Our Islands, Our Biodiversity, Our Future - in January via TV interview, newspaper article and advertisement.

An international team of scientists undertook a field study on Aitutaki and Mitiaro of Belkin’s Bitingmidge,

Survey information and notes on Mitiaro Sandflies in the Cook Islands.

This document is to report on the work carried out to assess the status and the possibility of controlling beach burr (Cenchrus Echinatus) on the island of Pukapuka. This work was conducted by the National Environment Service and funded under the Regional Invasive species program.

The Island of Suwarrow and its surrounding waters was declared a National Park in 1978 under the Conservation Act 1975. The legal opinion sought in 2001 clarifies that Suwarrow is Crown Land. Today, Suwarrow is under the jurisdiction of the National Environment Service (NES) since 2003, for the primary purpose of conserving, preserving, protecting and managing the natural resources of Suwarrow.