SPREP LIBRARY

The first of two workshops on Marine and Coastal Biodiversity in the Tropical Island Pacific Region was held at the East-West Center in Honolulu on 2 - 4 November 1994. The goal of the first workshop was to review the status of species systematics and database management studies and develop an action plan for marine and coastal biodiversity information management for the region. The workshop was divided into three parts...

Climate change is one of the greatest ecological, economic, and social challenges facing us today. The scientific evidence that human activities are contributing to climate change is compelling, but society is increasingly seeking information about the nature of the evidence and what can be done in response to a changing climate. This book provides some of that much-needed information from some of Australia's leading climate scientists.

Millions of people are crowded along the coastal fringes of continents, attracted by rich fertile land, transport connections, port access, coastal and deep-sea fishing, and recreational opportunities. In addition, significant populations live on oceanic islands with elevations of only a few meters. Many of the world's megacities, cities with populations of many millions, are situated at the coast, and new costal infrastructure developments worth billions of dollars are being undertaken in many countries.

At its tenth meeting, the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (COP 10) requested the Executive Secretary to work with Parties and other Government as well as competent organisations and regional initiatives, such as the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAo), regional seas conventions and action plans, and where appropriate, regional fisheries management organisations (RFMOs), with regards to fisheries management, to organise, including the setting of terms of reference, a series of regional workshop, with a primary objective to facilit

The Zoological Society of London (ZSL) is conducting research for the UNEP Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) into the effects of climate change on species protected by CMS. Species have been identified as having a high, medium or low vulnerability to the threat of climate change and have been categorised on the basis of a standardised assessment process. This leaflet summarises the emerging results from an assessment of CMS Appendix I species, in order to provide guidance to policy makers at the earliest opportunity.

The origin of this Action Strategy lies in the RETA (Regional Environmental Technical Assistance Project). No. 5403. funded by the Office of ihe Environment of the Asian Development Bank and executed by the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme. The Kingdom of Tonga was one of five countries which agreed to participate in a regional programme directed at strengthening the environmental management capabilities of Pacific Island member countries of the Asian Development Bank.