SPREP

La Convention pour la Diversite Biologique (CBD) developpee en 1992 lors du sommet de l'Organisation des Nations Unies a Rio de Janeiro reflete la reaction de la communaute mondiale face a l'erosion acceleree de la biodiversite mondiale.

National or Territory Invasive Species Strategies and Action Plans (NISSAP) are a critical document to ensure invasive species management is coordinated within a country or territory and that the different sectors involved with invasive species management are working together toward the same goals. NISSAP are essential to show political will for managing invasive species and are looked upon favourably by funding bodies.

Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) systems are the first line of defence against invasive species once they have penetrated national or inter-island biosecurity systems. For these systems to be effective, a plan is required to coordinate the responsible agencies and ensure both the systems and equipment to address the detected species are in place prior to the response. Several countries have developed these plans recently, which are available on the Battler Resource Base. SPREP thanks James Stanford, who drafted the text for this guide.

The invasive battler has a difficult job. Many of the management solutions for invasive species require a broad base of information to determine the best way to approach an issue and determine if the approach is feasible. Likely questions a battler will face are: what is that species? How did it get here and where will it go next? Is it a risk to our environment or other important national asset? Where else is this species found and what did they do about it?

Experience shows that you can get rid of myna while their population is small, but once the population becomes widespread, ongoing management will be required if the impacts of myna are to be reduced. This guide offers solutions and advice on how to decide what to do if myna are an issue in your country and was prepared by David Butler and Bill Nagle, who have assisted Pacific countries with myna solutions for both goals of eradication and control.

The Pacific is biologically unique, as its isolated islands provide ideal conditions for the evolution of new species. Thus, Pacific islands have high numbers of "endemic"species - species that are restricted to only one or a few islands and found nowhere else in the world.