SPREP

La Convention pour la Diversite Biologique (CBD) developpee en 1992 lors du sommet de l'Organisation des Nations Unies a Rio de Janeiro reflete la reaction de la communaute mondiale face a l'erosion acceleree de la biodiversite mondiale.

Experience shows that you can get rid of myna while their population is small, but once the population becomes widespread, ongoing management will be required if the impacts of myna are to be reduced. This guide offers solutions and advice on how to decide what to do if myna are an issue in your country and was prepared by David Butler and Bill Nagle, who have assisted Pacific countries with myna solutions for both goals of eradication and control.

While eradication projects on large islands require substantial funding and a high level of technical and logistical support, projects on small islands are much simpler and can achieve success with much less funding and outside assistance. The Pacific has thousands of such islands that can contribute to significant biodiversity outcomes. The purpose of this guide is to assist the practitioner in removing invasive rodents from small islands (less than 20 hectares) where access to all parts of the island is possible.

The presence of invasive species generally leads to negative impacts, some perhaps irreversible, and the economic costs from the impacts and their management can be substantial and long-lasting. Efforts to understand the extent of damages caused by invasive species are slowly gaining momentum globally; however, in many countries, efforts are only beginning. This guide will assist Pacific island practitioners to use the costs that result from invasive species incursions to gain support to fund prevention, management, restoration, research and outreach.

The Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment) through its Pacific sub-regional office are joining forces to provide support to Pacific delegates to the international UN Oceans Conference.

Fiji’s marine ecosystems are worth FJ$2.5 billion per year—exceeding the country’s total export value. We are strongly committed to sustaining these values to build an equitable and prosperous blue economy

This island nation contains many marine eco-systems, from globally significant coral reefs to mangroves, seagrass areas, seamounts and deep-sea trenches supporting at least 769 fish species, including sharks and rays, as well as whales, dolphins and sea turtles.