The eradication of black rats (Rattus rattus) from Dog Island, Anguilla, using ground-based techniques

Publication Date: 
2019
Place of Publication:
Location:
Call Number: 
[EL]
Notes: 
Available online
ISBN_ISSN: 
ISBN: 978-2-8317-1961-0
978-2-8317-1962-7
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.CH.2019.SSC-OP.62.en
Content Item Id: 
46816
The eradication of black rats (Rattus rattus) from Dog Island, Anguilla, using ground-based techniques
Abstract: 

Rat eradication techniques developed in New Zealand are a proven method for removing invasive rodents from islands worldwide. This technology moved rapidly from ground-based bait station operations to aerial application of rodenticides. Rat eradications on tropical islands using similar methods, have not always been as successful as those in temperate regions. As most previous eradications in the Caribbean have been on islands smaller than 50 ha, the eradication of black rats (Rattus rattus) from 207 ha Dog Island was a significant increase in size. Reptile and seabird populations on Dog Island had been in decline for a number of years and black rats were identified as the most likely factor. Following the feasibility study in 2007, the Dog Island Recovery Project was launched in 2011. This was a multiple-year project incorporating a ground-based eradication with establishment of biosecurity procedures to prevent reinvasion, alongside long-term monitoring of native species. Bait stations with cereal-based wax blocks containing brodifacoum at 0.005% w/w were established on a 30–50 m grid over the island. Interference with bait stations by non-target invertebrates, particularly crabs, was high and bait stations required moving or elevating to avoid this. However, there was no evidence of any non-target animals being killed or injured by the bait. Eradication success was confirmed in 2014.

GEFPAS Project: 
No
Record Id: 
82516